Människor jobbar vid ett konferensbord

The Value of Human Capital

How do we best utilize talent in a global labour market?

Date: 31 Aug 2021

Time: 16:3018:00 CEST

Where: Online on Zoom

I want to attend!

Abstract

Highly skilled people are seen as important human capital, valued by organizations worldwide. This workforce is also mobile – shifting from one country to another in search of more fulfilling opportunities, as employers and countries compete to attract the best minds.

There is significant investment in human capital management. Yet corporations, organizations, and institutions – including entire countries – leave large amounts of money on the table by failing to take maximal advantage of available human capital. Why is that?

In this discussion, various aspects related to the value of human capital will be explored – how is human capital defined? Why is there a need to understand cross-cultural management for the corporations? What are the cultural and social capitals that talent bring into the new country and bring back to their home country? Why is it important for the host country to develop and retain this human capital by focusing on their families? How do we view the unidirectional flow of human capital to wealthy Western countries vis-à-vis the brain drain that the talents’ home countries experience?

These questions along with other relevant ones will be examined with openness and curiosity at this interdisciplinary session. With an introduction drawing on research in behavioral economics, this session will explore some obstacles to thinking clearly about human capital. A discussion of these obstacles will help us see more clearly not just the problems – but also the solutions.

Explorer

The academic who leads the exploration and sets the tone of the discussion.

Photo: Niklas Björling/Stockholm University

Erik Angner
Practical Philosophy, Sweden

Erik Angner is Professor of Practical Philosophy at Stockholm University. He has separate PhDs in Economics, and in History and Philosophy of Science, both from the University of Pittsburgh. His research is in the intersection of philosophy, politics, and economics, with the aim to integrate the best available social science with the most careful philosophical reflection. His research interests are in the realm of behavioral and experimental economics, the science and philosophy of happiness, and the history, philosophy, and methodology of contemporary economics. Previously, he has been affiliated with the Institute for Futures Studies in Stockholm, George Mason University, and the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

Co-Explorers

The fellow academics who are from different disciplines. They explore the topic from various perspectives and make the discussion interdisciplinary.

Jasna Capo

Jasna Čapo
Ethnology / Anthropology, Croatia

Jasna Čapo is a Research Advisor at the Institute of Ethnology and Folklore Research in Zagreb, and Titular Professor at the University of Zagreb. She has a background in ethnology, cultural anthropology, demography, and French language and literature. She holds a PhD from the University of California, Berkeley. She has been a Humboldt Fellow and a visiting professor at several European universities.

Her research focuses on transnational migration and mobility, migrant incorporation in urban contexts, migrant-identity and place-making. She has been a Chief Investigator of the City-making Project in Zagreb, and is currently a Chief Investigator of the International Project comparing return migrations in Croatia, Kosovo and North Macedonia. Her latest book on Croatian migrants in Germany is entitled, Two Homes.

Gi-Wook Shin

Gi-Wook Shin
Sociology, United States

Gi-Wook Shin is Professor of Sociology at Stanford University, and Director of the Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center. He is a historical-comparative and political sociologist, and has published widely. His research interests are social movements, nationalism, development, and international relations.

Shin is now examining the potential benefits of talent flows in the Asia-Pacific region, where countries, cities, and corporations have competed with one another to enhance their stock of ‘brain power.’ With an interdisciplinary approach, this project examines flows of talent across national boundaries and assesses the efficacy of transnational human and social capital in environments such as cities, universities, and corporations in the Asia-Pacific region.

Orla O'Loughlin

Orla O’Loughlin
Theatre Directing, United Kingdom

Orla O’Loughlin is Vice Principal and Director of Drama at Guildhall School of Music and Drama where was conferred the title Professor in 2020. She has previously been Artistic Director of the Traverse Theatre, Pentabus Theatre and Associate Director at the Royal Court. As well as directing a wide range of award winning work in the UK and internationally, she has led masterclasses and projects at a variety of Drama Schools and conservatoires across the world. Orla is a former recipient of the James-Menzies Kitchin Directors Award and the Carlton Bursary at the Donmar Warehouse and was listed in The Observer as one of the top fifty Cultural Leaders in the UK and in The List Hot 100 of Women in the Arts.

Laurence Romani

Laurence Romani
Management and Organization, Sweden

Laurence Romani is Associate Professor at the Department of Management and Organization, and director of the Center for Responsible Leadership – both at the Stockholm School of Economics. Her recent work focuses on structural discrimination of migrants in their host society and how labour market discriminations can be addressed. She has published extensively in her research areas, which are  critical cross-cultural and diversity management, critical management studies, and multiple-paradigm studies. Laurence is also the Director for UN Principles for Responsible Management Education (PRME) at Stockholm School of Economics.

About Stockholm Explorative Talks

Stockholm Explorative Talks is a stage for academic discussions confronting global problems with an interdisciplinary approach, by pairing unlikely academics together. Stockholm Explorative Talks welcomes experts from all over the world for a dialogue best described as dedicated, courageous and surprising. The aim is to gather the world’s brightest brains to examine current issues from new angles, and to find creative solutions to common future challenges.

In 2021, Stockholm Explorative Talks also brings to you a webinar series featuring a diverse group of academics and artists from around the world, from different disciplines for an unusual, interdisciplinary exchange of perspectives pertaining to a range of topical themes. In the course of this transaction of ideas, the webinar series will endeavor to encourage incisive questions, and locate the best ways to explore current issues.

Stockholm Explorative Talks is founded and run by Stockholms Akademiska Forum – 18 universities and the City of Stockholm.

Stockholm Explorative Talks 2021
Människor jobbar vid ett konferensbord

The Value of Human Capital

How do we best utilize talent in a global labour market?

Date: 31 Aug 2021

Time: 16:3018:00 CEST

Where: Online on Zoom

I want to attend!

Abstract

Highly skilled people are seen as important human capital, valued by organizations worldwide. This workforce is also mobile – shifting from one country to another in search of more fulfilling opportunities, as employers and countries compete to attract the best minds.

There is significant investment in human capital management. Yet corporations, organizations, and institutions – including entire countries – leave large amounts of money on the table by failing to take maximal advantage of available human capital. Why is that?

In this discussion, various aspects related to the value of human capital will be explored – how is human capital defined? Why is there a need to understand cross-cultural management for the corporations? What are the cultural and social capitals that talent bring into the new country and bring back to their home country? Why is it important for the host country to develop and retain this human capital by focusing on their families? How do we view the unidirectional flow of human capital to wealthy Western countries vis-à-vis the brain drain that the talents’ home countries experience?

These questions along with other relevant ones will be examined with openness and curiosity at this interdisciplinary session. With an introduction drawing on research in behavioral economics, this session will explore some obstacles to thinking clearly about human capital. A discussion of these obstacles will help us see more clearly not just the problems – but also the solutions.

Explorer

The academic who leads the exploration and sets the tone of the discussion.

Photo: Niklas Björling/Stockholm University

Erik Angner
Practical Philosophy, Sweden

Erik Angner is Professor of Practical Philosophy at Stockholm University. He has separate PhDs in Economics, and in History and Philosophy of Science, both from the University of Pittsburgh. His research is in the intersection of philosophy, politics, and economics, with the aim to integrate the best available social science with the most careful philosophical reflection. His research interests are in the realm of behavioral and experimental economics, the science and philosophy of happiness, and the history, philosophy, and methodology of contemporary economics. Previously, he has been affiliated with the Institute for Futures Studies in Stockholm, George Mason University, and the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

Co-Explorers

The fellow academics who are from different disciplines. They explore the topic from various perspectives and make the discussion interdisciplinary.

Jasna Capo

Jasna Čapo
Ethnology / Anthropology, Croatia

Jasna Čapo is a Research Advisor at the Institute of Ethnology and Folklore Research in Zagreb, and Titular Professor at the University of Zagreb. She has a background in ethnology, cultural anthropology, demography, and French language and literature. She holds a PhD from the University of California, Berkeley. She has been a Humboldt Fellow and a visiting professor at several European universities.

Her research focuses on transnational migration and mobility, migrant incorporation in urban contexts, migrant-identity and place-making. She has been a Chief Investigator of the City-making Project in Zagreb, and is currently a Chief Investigator of the International Project comparing return migrations in Croatia, Kosovo and North Macedonia. Her latest book on Croatian migrants in Germany is entitled, Two Homes.

Gi-Wook Shin

Gi-Wook Shin
Sociology, United States

Gi-Wook Shin is Professor of Sociology at Stanford University, and Director of the Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center. He is a historical-comparative and political sociologist, and has published widely. His research interests are social movements, nationalism, development, and international relations.

Shin is now examining the potential benefits of talent flows in the Asia-Pacific region, where countries, cities, and corporations have competed with one another to enhance their stock of ‘brain power.’ With an interdisciplinary approach, this project examines flows of talent across national boundaries and assesses the efficacy of transnational human and social capital in environments such as cities, universities, and corporations in the Asia-Pacific region.

Orla O'Loughlin

Orla O’Loughlin
Theatre Directing, United Kingdom

Orla O’Loughlin is Vice Principal and Director of Drama at Guildhall School of Music and Drama where was conferred the title Professor in 2020. She has previously been Artistic Director of the Traverse Theatre, Pentabus Theatre and Associate Director at the Royal Court. As well as directing a wide range of award winning work in the UK and internationally, she has led masterclasses and projects at a variety of Drama Schools and conservatoires across the world. Orla is a former recipient of the James-Menzies Kitchin Directors Award and the Carlton Bursary at the Donmar Warehouse and was listed in The Observer as one of the top fifty Cultural Leaders in the UK and in The List Hot 100 of Women in the Arts.

Laurence Romani

Laurence Romani
Management and Organization, Sweden

Laurence Romani is Associate Professor at the Department of Management and Organization, and director of the Center for Responsible Leadership – both at the Stockholm School of Economics. Her recent work focuses on structural discrimination of migrants in their host society and how labour market discriminations can be addressed. She has published extensively in her research areas, which are  critical cross-cultural and diversity management, critical management studies, and multiple-paradigm studies. Laurence is also the Director for UN Principles for Responsible Management Education (PRME) at Stockholm School of Economics.

About Stockholm Explorative Talks

Stockholm Explorative Talks is a stage for academic discussions confronting global problems with an interdisciplinary approach, by pairing unlikely academics together. Stockholm Explorative Talks welcomes experts from all over the world for a dialogue best described as dedicated, courageous and surprising. The aim is to gather the world’s brightest brains to examine current issues from new angles, and to find creative solutions to common future challenges.

In 2021, Stockholm Explorative Talks also brings to you a webinar series featuring a diverse group of academics and artists from around the world, from different disciplines for an unusual, interdisciplinary exchange of perspectives pertaining to a range of topical themes. In the course of this transaction of ideas, the webinar series will endeavor to encourage incisive questions, and locate the best ways to explore current issues.

Stockholm Explorative Talks is founded and run by Stockholms Akademiska Forum – 18 universities and the City of Stockholm.

Stockholm Explorative Talks 2021